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Hurricane Katrina (B): Responding to an Ultra-Catastrophe in New Orleans Case Solution & Answer

When Hurricane Katrina struck the Gulf Coast on the morning of Monday, August 29, a wide swath of destruction in the region was cut, but despite inflicting massive damage, first appeared that the storm spared New Orleans down the worst of his wrath. But as Katrina happened, it soon became clear to those who did not evacuate the city that something was wrong: almost everywhere in New Orleans began to flood, and the next day about 80 percent of them would be underwater. Flash flood waters, the result of three major gaps in the levees that protect the city have created a humanitarian crisis of major proportions. Tens of thousands of people fled to rooftops or attics, where they anxiously waited for rescue, or wade in waist-deep water to find shelter, many went to the Superdome, which was already full of people who had waited the storm out there, or other makeshift shelters in the city. As the days dragged on, it is increasingly clear that almost all aspects of the response of the state, local governments and federal government was far below what was needed: the evacuees have languished in shelters or overpasses lower waiting for buses that do not arrive, the looting and the most serious crimes is endemic, food, water and medical care were reported as inadequate. As public outrage grew, fueled by television images of victims of storm idea, those responsible for emergency services and politicians, all the way up to President George W. Bush met struggling to cope the “ultra-catastrophe” that Katrina had visited New Orleans. Number HKS case 1844.0
by
Esther Scott,
Arnold Howitt
36 pages.
Release: June 19, 2006. Prod #: HKS149-PDF-ENG
Hurricane Katrina (B): In response to an “ultra-catastrophe” in New Orleans Case Solution

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